Tips for traveling with RA


Going on a trip? Don’t leave home without these tips on traveling with RA. Whether you're going on a flight, a train, or by car - we hope these ideas make your trip that much smoother. (To read the original article from Carla Kienast, click here.)

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Does having RA make travel more challenging?




Heavy luggage is a friend to no one, especially those of us with aches, pains, and/or fatigue. Pack light by keeping your wardrobe simple (choose a base color and accessorize around it) and bringing as few pairs of shoes as possible.

(To read the original article from Carla Kienast, click here.)

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Do you struggle with RA related fatigue?




Since luggage is expensive and you likely won’t want to purchase it often, be sure to choose luggage that makes traveling with RA easier. For example: bags with padded handles (which are easier to hold for sore hands) and bags that roll (with a matching smaller bag you can stack on top) make it so you don’t have to carry anything.

(To read the original article from Carla Kienast, click here.)

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Has RA affected the use your thumb(s)?




With aching shoulders, putting luggage in the overhead bin can be difficult. If you’re not traveling with someone who can help, consider checking your bag – that way you don’t have to hoist any weight above you on the go.

(To read the original article from Carla Kienast, click here.)

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Have you experienced RA damage to cartilage, tendons, or ligaments?




Get the best seat - with the most leg room - that you can afford. A first class seat on the aisle is as good as it gets, but if that’s out of your price range, many airlines offer seats with extra leg room for an additional charge. At the very least – try for an aisle seat, that way you can get up and stretch.

(To read the original article from Carla Kienast, click here.)

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Have you experienced neck pain that might be RA related?




Dehydration can increase problems of fatigue, stiffness, and dry mouth. Since you can’t take bottled water with you through security if you’re flying, be sure to either buy bottled water once you’re through, or take a refillable water bottle with you.

(To read the original article from Carla Kienast, click here.)

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Have you ever stopped an RA treatment due to side effects?




If your meds need to be refrigerated, keep them in a separate, insulated pouch for screening. Baggies of ice are better than gel packs for getting through security, because you can empty them at security and ask a food vendor for some ice once you’re through – explaining that you need it for medication. Most vendors are happy to do this for free.

(To read the original article from Carla Kienast, click here.)

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Do you have a medication plan in place for when you experience flares?




For people with suppressed immune systems, coming into contact with all kinds of people and germs while traveling can be dangerous. Always carry hand sanitizer with you. Wear a surgical-type safety mask if you’re sitting near someone who has a cold or contagious illness – it may look funny, but putting safety first is important and worthwhile.

(To read the original article from Carla Kienast, click here.)

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Do you take any vitamins/supplements for your RA?


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