My Walking Stick

I know anyone that has RA and it affects their lower back and spine can identify how painful it is. I am trying to discipline myself to stretch after an hours of sitting. It is getting much easier. See, I don’t do pain. My friend, my walking stick I keep in my car for emergencies. I have some days that I’m not able to get around without it. I went grocery shopping not that long ago. I didn’t have my walking stick. I’m at the check out counter and I was looking for something to lean on. The people in the store line were looking at me to say, “are you okay?” I politely just said, “I’m okay, moving slow, but okay.” That was a day I could have used by friend, my walking stick. I don’t need it some days, but that is not always the case. For me, I really fear falling and really breaking a bone. When I had an aneurysm it has always concerned me falling. My stick gives me the support, if something gives out. My friend, (walking stick) will give me a better chance of not hitting the ground. My left arm is weaker than my right armband my stick helps. Waiting in long lines for an extended period of time, my stick helps. It’s so clear to me that it was like yesterday, I could go anywhere without a walking stick. It makes you humble to not take the fact you can get around freely for granted. Many aren’t so fortunate today. Although the pain I go through, it blesses me to be able to go where I need to go, walking stick and all.

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Comments

View Comments (6)
  • Texasmomma
    2 years ago

    Ah yes, your friend! I have one as well but my poor little friends usefulness has about run its course unfortunately. I truly need an electric wheelchair. It needs to be electric because just like most of us,my hands don’t work like they used to and my shoulders,well,they don’t either! So the chances of me getting further than a couple yards pushing myself just aren’t very high! I keep my prayers going up that I may have back surgery some time in the not too distant future. Life would be so grand to be a wee bit more mobile and independent,especially since I am just a spring chicken of 54. Okay,perhaps that’s not chicken-worthy age anymore, but I feel my chronological age and my RA age are very far apart!

  • celia123 author
    2 years ago

    Yes,your 54 years young.I know all will be well with your surgery.Thanks for your comment and so wishing you a speedy recovery.I know alot have retired their walking stick for a wheel chair.It let’s the world know RA is real and how it affects our ability to be mobile.Best regards to you.C elia

  • Richard Faust moderator
    2 years ago

    Thanks for writing Texasmomma. Glad to hear that you see the upside of the electric wheelchair. My wife, Kelly Mack (a contributor here) has used one for years. As she says in this article “I use a motorized wheelchair and its one of the best decisions I’ve made for my quality of life with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).”

    https://rheumatoidarthritis.net/living/staying-mobile/

    In addition, if you do plan on surgery, this article offers some tips for preparing for RA surgery: https://rheumatoidarthritis.net/surgery/tips-on-preparing-for-ra-surgery/.

    Hope this information is useful. Keep us posted on how you are doing. Best, Richard (RheumatoidArthritis.net Team)

  • celia123 author
    2 years ago

    Thanks for the comment.This was a excellent read.I really enjoyed it and took in every word.Thanks

  • Erin Rush moderator
    2 years ago

    Hello, celia123! I really loved this post of yours! I am so glad you have found something that works for you and allows you the freedom and independence to go about your day, even on those days when your mind is willing but perhaps, the body isn’t! What a positive way of looking at an adaptive aid — instead of seeing it as an embarrassment or a reminder of the limitations of your body, you see it as a friend and a source of independence. What a neat way of shifting perspective. Thank you so much for sharing your thoughts on ‘your friend’ with us and I hope you are never without it again! Thanks for being a part of this community and for sharing your positivity and insight on this site. We’re glad to have you here! Best, Erin, RheumatoidArthritis.net Team Member.

  • celia123 author
    2 years ago

    Thank you for your gracious comment.I like your words because they really articulate my story.

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