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Natural Remedies & Alternative Therapies

Medical Marijuana Cannabis

  • By Karmel

    Am desperate to find something that will arrest the onslaught of my Rheumatoid. Have been harmed by 2 medications and am sick of being sick.

    I read Medical Cannabis in the form of Sativex/Nabiximols is arresting Rheumatoid, MS and other auto immune diseases Osteoarthritis and Diabetes.

    It is legal in USA/Canada and hopefully soon Australia. Anyone trying it.

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    • By sharoncookie57

      Yes I just started it last week and can do much more. First thing I found was that my brain felt better, more clearer. With in 2 days of taking it I went shopping by my self and walked around stores till noon. Had some walking pain but much improved. That was so much fun haven’t done that in a year. Had to go with husband and hold his arm to walk right.
      Doing much more work around the house like baking cooking and keeping the house looking nice. Still can’t do floors or hard things like that, hey! it only the third day. So far a very good start.

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    • By Erin Rush Moderator

      I am so glad this treatment has been working out so well for you, sharoncookie57! I hope it continues and you are able to enjoy more activities that make you happy. Thanks for sharing your experience with cannabis! Best, Erin, RheumatoidArthritis.net Team Member.

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    • By Anonymous

      sharoncookie57,

      Thank you for speaking out about what is working for you and I’m so, so glad you are finding relief! If you are taking the Cannabis Oil, you will likely find that symptoms begin falling away, day by day. It doesn’t all happen overnight, but in my case it just slowly kept making me better until I began to believe that i would simply wake up one day and be completely healed.

      After a year on the oil, all of my major symptoms are gone. I feel healthy. I feel strong again. I do feel that I have come to a plateau where the illness is still there and still let’s me know it with occasional aches and some nerve issues, minor fatigue and occasional minor depression. But, if this is the best I can do, and all without pharmaceuticals, Im in!!
      Can you share how you are using cannabis? I think it’s really important for those of us that are having success with cannabis to speak out and share the details of our success with our fellow RA warriors.

      I look forward to hearing more about your experience with Cannabis!!

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  • By Virginia Carner

    I had no idea that it was even being studied, I am a RN and I have RA…I support medical marijuana especially for cancer patients (I have seen the amazing results first hand with both family and patients) and I hear that it helps with seizures…I hate opioid pain medicines as they are highly addictive and people are killing themselves daily…on the other side, I am in some much pain so much of the time…picture someone taking an impact hammer and smashing your fingers…then spraining your ankles, knees, elbows, wrist, back and neck…now go to work…what works for one person, might not work for another…but if it helps one person with the horror of living with this disease, then I do believe that person has the constitutional right for that treatment…what has happened to this world? People, diseases, medications…people have tried to cookie cutter things…everyone reacts to treatments the way they are going to react…we were made this way…research needs to continue to look for answers, but professionals need to remember that everyone is different. I used recreational marijuana for a short time as a young adult…not my cup of tea…made me sleeppy, paranoid, hungry and for lack of a better word “dumb”…wow except for the paranoid part (might not exist if it was legal)…it sounds better than all over pain and depression and intelligence enough to know how crappy life is with RA…

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    • By Karmel

      Happy New Year Andrew and Virginia Carner. My cousin a retired nurse and her husband now touring California and Mexico. Cousin Helen has started drinking MEDICAL MARIJUANA TEA. Some medical marijuana has very little THC and more CBD, CBD being the ingredient that stops RA inflammation. http://cannimed.ca gives combinations/strengths of mmj.

      My cousins rheumatoid is now in remission after 2 l/2 months while on mmj.

      There was a study done 2005 by English Professor of Bone & Joint. He claims how and why Sativex medical marijuana works. http://www.gwpharm.com/Rheumatology Medical Marijuana cures rheumatoid. Andrew you could probably understand this guy’s technical wording. I’d be interested to know what you think ???

      Thing is Pharma companies make mostly synthetic drugs not the natural form so guess there is NO money in a Natural herb cure.

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  • By Ava

    I use Medical Marijuana, I have a certified card, and am happy to say when I am so miserable and I haven’t eaten in a couple days then it truly does help… the stigma of “being dumb” is so aggravating.. I am a 54 woman who has worked in the medical field for over 20 years an I can assure you I am not DUMB… You can order certain kinds, to help with certain illnesses. People really need to educate themselves on this, just as they have on all these medications…I have found, I have hardly had to take my pain medications, plus they have a cream that I use, when my joints are so swollen, that I can barely move, that is wonderful, can’t go without it.. It is just like everything else, your afraid of the unknown, like I said educate, before you start knocking this… Whether the studies show it works or not, I can tell you first hand, it does…I don’t need a piece of paper to tell me I feel better after taking a hit…And I live in a State where its legal. Study up people…

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  • By Karmel

    Thanks Ava I knew it does work on rheumatoid from other rheumatoid sufferers where it is available or used illegally. There was a study (3 phase) done in England in 2005 that proved it, as the body has natural cannabis receptors. http://www.gwpharm.com/rheumatoid. Done by a Professor of Bone & Joint Health but was canned everywhere. I guess Pharma is not interested in natural herbs as they usually produce synthetic drugs so that’s where the money is. I read an article that even Jesus used the cannabis (Kaneh) oil to anoint people and cure people, mixed with cinnamon and myrrh.

    Australia is heading towards legalising MEDICAL mmj by end of year I am praying for it as my Rheumatoid is painfully and steadily killing and disabling me in agony.

    A company called Phytotech Medical have just registered on the Australian stock exchange – within l/2 an hour the shares all sold and went from 20c to 40c and another batch of shares released. I think its an Israeli company hoping to grow and make medical marijuana here in Australia to supply half the world’s needs. Australia supplies half the worlds opium now.

    As you say educate yourselves – yes Medical mmj is not the same hallucination strength of cannabis off the street (often mixed with ice). MMj is between 0 to 9% THC. It is the CBD that stops the inflammation.

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  • By Ava

    Karmel, MMJ has come a long way… I never used until I was over 21 years old an then I was just an occasional user.. What really made me a believer was when I watched my younger sister suffer from Ovarian Cancer for 5years and all the miserable things that she went thru…She was given MMJ an her symptoms were at least relieved a little, so she was able to participate in family functions an eat, when she hadn’t eaten for days, and no not be dumb… They have so much stuff now days, medical sticks for migraines, wonderful, and as I said the cream I use on my joints especially my knees because I can hardly walk on them.. Id much rather smoke a joint than take a pill, so tired of the medicine game….If your not treated like a drug addict then its so expensive now you can’t afford it.. Im opting for the alternative methods, I don’t want their poison in my body, I have seen close hand, with 3 count them, 3 siblings with Cancer, die right in front of me… All after using their poison, I don’t want to be next…So take some time an study up, I think you will find there will be something there for you, good luck on your health and peace to you….I will pray for you….take care..

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  • By Karmel

    Am grateful to people like you Ava for speaking out. Anti-inflammatories work some on my pain but give me reflux so another pill needed or I’d get cancer. On it goes more pills for the side effects.

    I lost my Sales Manager’s job at 56 as I could not drive my car on many days. Then a foot operation went wrong putting me in a wheelchair never to walk again. Can’t sue hospitals in Australia courts won’t let you. No employer could or would employ me as the wheelchair frightened them off, or no accessible toilets, steps, one told me I’d be bothering other staff for help ! Am angry my working life cut short and I live in poverty now. If I don’t get MMj soon will be the death of me as my body is deteriorating fast.

    As an Anthropology student I travelled a bit in the East and Far East. I saw rock caves & buildings in Iran & Afghanistan where the Cannabis leaf is painted on the walls. Cannabis oil cured a King of Syria from psoriasis. I did smoke some Cannabis the prized black brown stuff Indica strain sold in blocks in Afghanistan (Herat & Kabul) in a water pipe but at 21 I then had no signs of Rheumatoid. I’d love to do a study in that country as to how many Western world illnesses (i.e. Cancer/Rheumatoid) they do not have because. Like to talk to village elders as to what they use it for as medicine. Cannabis was legal until around 1941 what a loss to the world and suffering people that Big Pharma took it away. I pray that Medical Marijuana makes a big return, made to Standards 0 to 9% THC 0 to 9% CBD unlike the cannabis sold on the street.

    Big thank you to rheumatoidarthritisnet & Andrew for at least letting the you’s and me have our say. Other sites wrongly will not discuss it.

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  • By Mariah Z. Leach Moderator

    Hi Karmel~

    I am not familiar with the laws in Australia, but in the United States there is a law called the Americans with Disabilities Act, which prevents employers from discriminating against people for having disabilities like RA. It also requires employers to provide reasonable accommodations to help people do their jobs. It may make sense to check and see if there is similar legislation in place in Australia.

    Best of luck to you!

    ~Mariah~ (Site Moderator)

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  • By Mariah Z. Leach Moderator

    Hi Sneed~

    I live in Colorado and people are often asking me whether I use MJ to help with my pain – but my main concern would be that it would reduce my efficiency during the day! I am mostly frustrated by my pain and limitations because it keeps me being productive, so a solution that makes me even less productive doesn’t seem useful to me! But I am happy that more research is being done into MJ as an option for RA patients.

    Thanks for sharing!
    ~Mariah~ (Site Moderator)

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  • By Sneed

    Mariah: As mentioned in my post -and I too live in Colorado – I find it far too distracting to use during the day but quite valuable for sleep time.

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  • By Kathy P.

    My husband started doing research on MMJ when I got cellulitis, and then was having problems with finding a new biologic that would work and without an allergic reaction. I was really miserable and couldn’t do even the simplest ADL functions. He put me in the car and took me to Colorado.

    We spent 3 days down there, where I tried various types and forms of the recreational type. Since we were going to a dispensary that sold both medical and recreational, they were able to discuss with me the various strains and which might be most helpful.

    It was eye-opening. The relief was almost immediate. I had my first really restful sleep in over a year. I did not need to take my very strong opioid painkillers. I was cripping around on a cane when I went down there, and didn’t need the cane by the time I got back.

    There have been subsequent trips to CO. Each time, I learn a little more about it. What helps one might not have the same effect for another person. I’ve found one particular formula that one dispensary has that has been wonderful. I can vape it for a few days, and return home for a week at a time without pain. The euphoric content is low, so I’m less fuzzy than I am if I’m on opioid painkillers. When I get back home, I’m able to work like a demon until I start seizing up again.

    Since it is illegal where I live, I have to travel to CO. The difference is so dramatic, we’ll be moving to CO soon, as I don’t want to break the law where we presently live. We’ve found a town we like and the housing is reasonable. Entering into a mortgage or a lease wasn’t what we want to do at our age, but it’s either that or a really miserable existence for me. I am so very fortunate that I have a spouse that is willing to do this for me.

    I’ve spoken with both my regular doctor where I presently live, and my rheumatologist in CO. Both have said they’re perfectly OK with me using it. The rheumatologist said it helps many of his patients with both pain and sleep problems. However, because there have been no studies done with MMJ and RA, and he knows that it helps with the pain and inflammation, he’s not confident that it will prevent bone and joint deterioration. For this reason, he wants me to stay on the biologics.

    There are many methods of delivery besides smoking or vaping it. You have more options on the medical side than you do on the recreational side, and of course, most people going for the recreational are using it for the purpose of getting high. Medical tends more towards the medical benefits (CBDs) with low amounts of THC (the euphoric part). You can get it as a drink, brownies, gummy candies, lollypops, sub-lingual drops, patches, salves and sprays, to name those that I know about.

    If you are able to go somewhere to try it, and no, I wouldn’t try the street marijuana, I’d say take someone with you for the driving and try it for a few days. You might find there is such a difference that it’s worth the trouble.

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  • By Andrew Lumpe, PhD Moderator

    Thanks for sharing your experiences Kathy. There does seem to be some medical properties in that plant somewhere. Scientists and researchers just aren’t exactly sure yet as there are so many chemicals in the plant. And dosing isn’t exact. Some do argue that CBD and not euphoria inducing THC provides the medicinal properties but I’ve read others argue that both compounds must be present in order to maximum benefit. But that’s how many of our medications came into existence…a natural substance where a chemical was isolated and tested. Maybe one day we’ll have a better sense. In the meantime, it is wise to continue to take RA meds which can slow down the disease process.

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  • By Broken73

    I use it when the pain is so bad that the pain medicine doesn’t touch it, and I can’t stand another minute. It’s not legal here, but it helps with pain, and with sleep. I don’t like to smoke it, and I don’t like the high feeling, but I have run out of options, and the government still treats marijuana like the devil’s weed!

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  • By Mariah Z. Leach Moderator

    Hi Broken73~

    I certainly understand the feeling of running out of options when it comes to pain. I hope that you will also bring your concerns to your rheumatologist and see if some changes can be made to your treatment plan that might also bring about some improvements, especially considering that marijuana isn’t a legal option for you right now. For example, sometimes my rheumatologist prescribes sleep medication for me when I am struggling to sleep. Perhaps some PT or massage or a pain management specialist might be able to help as well. I personally find Epsom salt soaks to be an important part of my pain management routine! I just want to encourage you to keep looking for solutions!

    Best of luck to you!
    ~Mariah~ (Site Moderator)

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    • By Broken73

      I do like a very hot Epsom salt bath, but that only lasts as long as the water is hot. I have tried many different things to ease the pain of RA. Massage, acupuncture, exercise in water, and I have a pain management Dr, who is very good, but his dosage doesn’t doesn’t cut the pain. No one wants to do anything illegal, but when it comes down to getting relief or considering a bullet in the head some relief, illegal or not is the only choice.

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  • By Kathy P.

    MMJ was important enough for me to maintain residency in CO, in a different state than our home. If you have the means, you might consider flying into a state and city that has retail MJ and try it for a few days. I believe Washington state, Washington D.C. and Colorado all have legal MJ (retail vs. medical). Canada and many other countries will legalize it by the end of the year.

    For other information, pro and con, dependent on the source, but with citations, available on the NORML website. Do some studying before you go. MJ is not the medical panacea for every ailment, or for every person.

    Good luck and I hope you feel better soon.

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  • By Mariah Z. Leach Moderator

    Hi Kathy ~

    I think you make a very good point about the importance of doing research and knowing that MJ is not necessarily the answer for every ailment or every person. In fact, I think this is true for every treatment and therapy out there. One of the things that is so difficult about living with RA is that everyone’s RA is different – and everyone reacts differently to different types of treatments and therapies. This means that the only way to know whether a potential treatment or therapy will help you is to give it a try – but it’s important to make sure you do so with the advice of a medical professional.

    ~Mariah~ (Site Moderator)

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  • By Anonymous

    For years, I bought into the rhetoric that cannabis is a harmful, addictive, gateway drug that has no medicinal value. In fact, I have been heavily involved in anti-drug efforts for most of my life. So, I can say that I have extensive experience with different aspects of cannabis.

    The first thing that doctors will say, in my experience, about any non-traditional or alternative treatment is that they are not tested or proven to be safe or effective. So true. Unfortunately, the system seems to be designed to make sure that it stays that way. And, the doctors say ‘more tests are needed’ to evaluate the efficacy of any alternative treatment. You are more than welcome to wait the 10 years that that it will take for the FDA to approve cannabis as an acceptable means of treating illness. I, however, will not.

    Anecdotal evidence as to the effectiveness of cannabis abounds and can be found everywhere. True evidence that cannabis is harmful and does not have medicinal value, cannot. In fact, the government holds a patent that discusses the neuroprotective qualities of cannabis and, you can even find information about the positive effects for cancer patients on cancer.gov (Simply go to that site and search ‘cannabis’).

    After heavily researching RA and heavily researching cannabis as a medicine, I began using it with undeniable success. I first tried CBD Oil. CBD Oil has an almost non-existent level of THC and is said to help a myriad of illnesses. Personally, I didn’t notice any tangible differences in symptoms while taking the CBD.

    Next, I tried the full extract oil (Rick Simpson oil, cannabis oil, FECO). This is an oil that contains both THC and CBD. It’s a dark colored oil (like a paste) that you take by mouth. In my case, I only take the oil at night, before bed. During the day, I take my other supplements. For me, the side effects are sleepiness and a sense of well being. This, along with my other supplements, has brought me to a fully functional, pain free state in which I can live normally. And, it has not just affected my pain. It has diminished inflammation, nodules have completely disappeared, fatigue is kept in check and cognitive issues have cleared up.

    Additionally, I have found that vaping with a handheld vaporizer, effectively diminishes the chronic fatigue and depression that comes with RA. Like magic. There are even strains of cannabis that contain higher CBD levels, which negates the high feeling yet still helps with inflammation and pain.

    So, we can continue the outdated conversation about how it hasn’t been proven effective or safe, while we and those around us continue to suffer with debilitating diseases like RA. Or, we can listen, actually listen, to those that have safely and effectively treated themselves with cannabis, and in doing so, have avoided the harmful and well known side effects of pharmaceutical drugs.

    This, I feel, is a very important conversation to have right now as there are at least 10 different votes that will be taking place in November 2016 that will decide the availability of medical and/or recreational access for several states. And, you might scoff at recreational marijuana… But, states with recreational marijuana serve to allow those that are sick, but not covered under medical marijuana access, to get the ‘medicine’ that they need.

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  • By Erin Rush Moderator

    Thank you for sharing, DesertStormTrooper! I think you share some good points in your post. Cannabis has been proven to be helpful for a number of chronic conditions and has helped some of our members with their RA symptoms. I think to two big concerns that come up within our community are efficacy and quality assurance. Since cannabis is not regulated, it can be hard to make sure one is getting a consistent, quality product every time. And, as Mariah mentioned above, like any treatment, cannabis works wonders for some individuals and not as well for others. I understand your point about not wanting to wait years for FDA regulation, though. When people are hurting, it can be hard to wait for the wheels of federal legislation/regulation to get rolling.

    It is always good to have a new tool in our arsenal against RA and cannabis can be a welcome addition for many individuals dealing with RA symptoms and pain.

    Thanks again for sharing with us! Best, Erin, RheumatoidArthritis.net Team Member.

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    • By Anonymous

      Hi Erin.

      First, I want to say how thankful I am that we are able to discuss this on this site. Had I never experienced the devastation that RA can cause, I wouldn’t find it so important. However, one of the things that RA has given me is true empathy regarding others that are experiencing what I have experienced. And, to me, the most important thing that we can have in our toolbox, as victims of this disease, is a multitude of treatment options.

      I also want to say that I appreciate your thoughtful and insightful comments.

      You are correct in saying that some treatment options might work better for some than others. This is a multifaceted disease that can involve the entirety of our bodies, including all organs and even deep tissue. And, due to the randomness of each person’s symptoms and the variety of areas that can be affected, treatment considerations can’t really be easily packaged for everyone.

      You are also correct in your concerns about consistency and purity of cannabis as a medicine. My personal thoughts on this are as follows:

      * Personally, I would be very, very hesitant to trust anything coming from the black market. If I absolutely felt that I had no other choice, maybe. But otherwise, the risks are numerous and real.
      * Legal states, like Colorado, have established standardized testing procedures that help to ensure that the product is mold and contaminant free. With this in mind, I have found that consistency and quality can be relatively assured when purchasing from a licensed dispensary. These consumer protections are the direct result of legalization.

      Lastly. Cannabis is definitely a subject that has been shrouded by misinformation and undue persecution for many, many years. It is also still illegal in most states, which should be a consideration as well for anyone thinking about using it as a treatment option. As for me, the greater risk lies in remaining sick. Call it what you will. I call it survival.

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  • By Mariah Z. Leach Moderator

    Hello DesertStormTrooper ~

    Thanks so much for sharing your perspective on this. I agree the risks are real in states where this option is not legalized, but it does seem like more states are heading in the direction of legalization (California, for instance). Hopefully this will bring additional information to the table for all of us!

    ~Mariah~ (Site Moderator)

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  • By Mariah Z. Leach Moderator

    Hello DesertStormTrooper ~

    Thanks so much for sharing your perspective on this. I agree the risks are real in states where this option is not legalized, but it does seem like more states are heading in the direction of legalization (California, for instance). Hopefully this will bring additional information to the table for all of us!

    ~Mariah~ (Site Moderator)

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  • By Victoria Hamman

    I know it’s late to be adding to these comments. I’m 59 years old and have have RA for 17 years. I have smoked cannabis for a long time. I am also a naturopathic dr., and I have some patients for whom cannabis is a godsend, as they can’t take any of the pharmaceuticals due to ulcers (from previous drugs,) or latent TB, or some other problem.
    My experience is that CBD alone is often not effective for pain. I have seen it be effective for other conditions (seizures, intestinal bleeding,) but not pain. For me personally, CBD doesn’t work at all, and really makes me feel awful, THC, on the other hand, works more like the opioids and other Central Nervous System Pain meds – it is necessary to get high for that kind of pain relief to work. People often say about opioids – “it doesn’t make the pain go away, but I don’t care so much about it anymore.” That’s how THC works. There has long been a synthetic THC called Marinol, used mostly for cancer patients. I knew the drug rep and she told me that it was very frustrating that the physicians would not prescribe a high enough dose for the patient to benefit – the patient had to get high.
    The cannabis growers and producers in CA have become very sophisticated. Indica might be better for some and sativa for others. I can direct my patients to purchase strains that are good for particular needs; like sleep or relaxation, uplifting or clear thinking.)
    I’ve never had much success with salves and other topicals. Cannabis edibles are an excellent sleep aid but one must be careful with dosage.
    As with all medicines, cannabis is not for everybody. It does at least appear to have a better success rate and fewer side effects than many of the pharmaceuticals used for RA.

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    • By Anonymous

      Hi Victoria,

      It’s never too late to begin a conversation about the effects of cannabis on serious disease. Such a versatile medicine! I agree that CBD oil (straight CBD) seemed to be ineffective for me. Full Extract Cannabis Oil however, is not just pain relieving, but somewhat curative for diseases like RA. I’ve been taking the oil, at night, for about 10 months and am maintaining a very high level of health, with zero pain and very little inflammation. And, I don’t smoke, but occasional vaping kind of rounds everything out and beats my fatigue down, lifts my mood and helps me sleep like a baby. I ‘literally’ thank God every night when I take my oil because I was being destroyed by this disease before I found it.

      Thank you so much for posting and helping to get the word out.
      For those that want more information about cannabis oil (or FECO, RSO), here is some info.
      http://caregiversforlife.net/colorado-cannabis-oil/

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  • By StillFlaring

    Hi DesertStormTrooper, thanks for the info! Your phrase, “a fully functional, pain free state in which I can live normally”, struck me like a rock. At this point, that is only a dream for me, but I will be looking at the links you provided and talking with my rheumatologist about this.

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  • By kingkatekong

    I am fortunate to live in CA where medical marijuana abounds! I personally do like the affects of being “high,” but these days in states where marijuana is legal, you can find just about anything and in any form–any dose, any strength, any delivery method, etc. For me, there is no better remedy for pain & sleep. Given the choice between an opiate or marijuana, I will choose marijuana 10 times out of 10 unless the pain is really severe opiates are better, but they have many undesirable side-effects, namely addiction.

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  • By dannelpr

    Yes it does help with RA. I take CBD oil and have totally stopped taking the percocet 10/325 pain killers. I buy only 100% pure CBD oil. No additives like glycerin or purified water. I take 5 drops in the morning and 5 in the evening. I am on an injection of Humira once a week, and hope to cut that down to twice a month next visit to my doctor. CBD oil works great for me.

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  • By Erin Rush Moderator

    Hi tseA! Thanks for sharing your thoughts on this topic. As far as I know, the side effects from medical marijuana usage are pretty minimal, depending on which form of medical marijuana you choose to use. I do hope some of our members can share their personal experiences with you.

    In the meantime, here’s an article, followed by member comments, on this topic — https://rheumatoidarthritis.net/living/medical-marijuana-a-viable-option-for-the-treatment-of-ra/comment-page-1/#comments.

    Thanks again for sharing!

    Best, Erin, RheumatoidArthritis.net Team Member.

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    • By tseA

      Hi Erin,

      Sorry for late reply ive been busy for awhile. Btw thanks for the info, im using CBD oil now and it really helps my back pain.
      Thanks again!

      Regards Tsea

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  • By Lydia

    Hi I am do to this site. I have ra just started CBD oil. I was wondering if anyone has been using the cream, have you had success with cream and if so is it high THC with low CBD or low THC with high CBD? I’m looking for relief on my wrists and hands that are so bad. Any help would be appreciated

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  • By Solon004

    My sister has reumetoid arthritis. She was diagnosed when she was 12 and has used medical marijuana strains and one of them was this https://www.bonzaseeds.com/blog/bruce-banner-3/, along with her other meds for the past 9 years. I’m not sure how it helps if not by just taking her mind off the pain. I’ll have to ask her. She was supposed to be in a wheel chair by the time she was 15 but she’s holding on strong. She doesn’t use it all the time but Ive had to go help her roll a few joints because her joints in her hands have been so swollen. I feel sorry for anyone who has to suffer from that kind of pain on a daily basis. Even if it does help her by elevating her mood and taking her mind off the pain, I say more power to her.

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  • By Piano14

    There are pilot programs in many states. You will need paper work from your rheumatologist to get started. The rest of the application is on line. Mine also included fingerprinting, but I dont know if that’s required in every state. Oh, it also costs $100 per year for the card -paid to the state.

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