Skip to Accessibility Tools Skip to Content Skip to Footer

Getting humble and gadgets…

I used to make fun of gadgets.

You know, the ‘every kitchen, bathroom, bedroom needs this, makes a great gift, the current trend of wedding gifts, two for one price’…you get the idea. I equated it as a lazy person’s version of never picking up a knife to see what it was actually used for in preparing a meal, stirring your coffee with a spoon instead of a self-stirring mug (yes, there is such a thing) that uses a AAA battery and you push the button or the can opener that pushes into the can and lets it open by a AA battery.

Well, here comes the dx’d of RA.
And who quit making jokes?

I spoke with a nurse of my Rhuemy Doc about this one year. I griped about when my hands start puffing out like miniatures sausages and even when I grab a convenience dinner to pop in the microwave it’s hard and painful to open. She smiled and told me that one patient she knew still kept a paper cutter from her years teaching school propped on her kitchen counter where she positioned the package and whacks it down like a guillotine. Then she dumps the content on a paper plate in her microwave and voilà! A meal.

‘You have to find a gadget that works for you’ she ended the conversation.

Enter my humility.

Oh, I have experimented and found those that work, when the pain dominates my desire for a halfway decent meal. Or to put my shoes on without holding my breath with the urge to scream. Or to put on a tee shirt without pretending to be shot from a cannon.
And I have a nice set of these gadgets that makes the life easier.
And a seemingly large cache of batteries.

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The RheumatoidArthritis.net team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

Comments

  • mcadwell
    1 year ago

    I completely understand about the gadgets. I didn’t understand why anyone would need things like this…until it happened to me.

    Rubber covers on doorknobs and lamp switches.

    Glow in the dark tape on so many things so I can grab them in the dark (fingers are numb so can’t rely on finding the things by feel.)

    Had to buy an electric can opener because I can no longer use manual ones.

    Vegetable stomper (that’s what I call it – put in a vegetable, slam down the lid and you have diced vegetable).

    Large binder clips, on the toothpaste tube, makes it easier to squeeze out the toothpaste.

    Bar soap in a pantyhose leg, tied to the shower curtain rod, keeps me from dropping the soap and I don’t have to stuggle to pick up the slippery thing (and no soap residue anywhere either).

    Bed is now on risers (with electrical plugins!) because I can’t bend over easily to make the bed now. Everything has been moved to waist level because of that too.

    My Instant Pot now lives on my countertop, instead of a cabinet, because it’s just easier.

    My laundry basket now wears a harness, with padding, that I can loop over my shoulders, so I can get it downstairs to my washer/dryer.

    My nightstand has all my medicine on it. I’ve found that if I put the bottles away I completely forget to take them!

    I’ve found dust is a protective coating. 🙂

    We just have to figure out what works best for each of us.

  • Richard Faust moderator
    1 year ago

    Thanks so much for sharing these great tips mcadwell. You are absolutely right that everyone needs to assess their situation – a little trial and error – and figure out what works for them. Thought you might be interested in these videos from a couple of or contributors on helpful gadgets:

    https://rheumatoidarthritis.net/video/my-favorite-gadgets/

    https://rheumatoidarthritis.net/nutrition/top-12-kitchen-friendly-gadgets-that-will-make-preparing-meals-easier/.

    Wishing you the best. Richard (RheumatoidArthritis.net Team)

  • Poll